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AALAS General Standards

The General Standards are a Flipped Learning roadmap to help educators reach every student in every class every day. These standards save time and support effective implementation of global best practices while avoiding typical mistakes.  They are organized into eleven domains for clarity.

 

  • Know and be able to explain the definition of Flipped Learning
  • Understand that Flipped Learning is a framework that supports all other active learning strategies
  • Understand the importance of instructional design when planning for Flipped Learning
  • Understand the distinction between Flipped Learning and Blended Learning
  • Understand how the role of an educator moves from lecturer to facilitator
  • Understand priorities and barriers to progress
  • Understand the principles of andragogy and pedagogy in designing courses and lessons
  • When possible, define clear roles for everyone involved in creating Flipped Learning courses (subject specialist, instructional designer, technologist)
  • Ensure courses are designed with input from subject-matter experts and instructional designers
  • Use Backwards Design to plan effective flipped lessons and units
  • Use Bloom’s taxonomy to plan: lower levels of Bloom’s go to the individual space, and higher levels to the group space
  • Plan to differentiate in both the group and the individual spaces
  • Ensure that pre-class media link directly to learning outcomes and group space activities
  • Use a simple workflow template
  • Present course content in a logical and consistent fashion
  • Label all artifacts as pre-class, in-class, and post-class
  • Adapt flipped instructional techniques to make them effective with large groups
  • Use frequent, formative assessments
  • Use a large portion of teacher class time to engage in structured micro-conversations with students
  • Select different types of questions according to Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • Design assessments where students have a choice in how they will present their mastery of the concepts
  • Have a plan for students who come to class having completed the pre-work but still don’t fully grasp the concepts
  • Align all assessments with learning outcomes
  • Provide assessments with clear rubrics
  • Provide assessments that involve the creation of a real-life product or the use of real-life skills
  • Design your physical space for an active classroom
  • Create active-learning spaces where students own and drive their own learning
  • Creatively use the physical space you have to maximize active learning
  • To the extent possible, make the physical space flexible to accommodate a variety of deeper learning strategies
  • Allow learners flexibility and autonomy in how they use the physical space
  • Make sure pre-class media are short
  • Make sure pre-class media are intuitive
  • Make sure pre-class media contain the big idea
  • Hold students accountable for pre-class work
  • Use lower levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (remembering, understanding)
  • Strategically choose an appropriate medium for the pre-class media (text, annotated whiteboard video, screencast, plain video)
  • Focus on what you want to achieve in the group space when creating the individual space pre-work
  • Ensure there is a strong link between pre-class media and what happens in the classroom
  • Learn how to create flipped videos and other flipped media using the tools at your disposal
  • Ensure that videos include an appropriate mix of text, pictures, discussions between people, short integrated films, the instructor writing, narration
  • Make sure longer pre-class media are chunked into smaller pieces
  • Teach students how to interact with the pre-class media including taking notes and preparing questions for class
  • Introduce pre-class media with a prior knowledge question to activate student thinking
  • Include practical concrete activities that students can engage in during or after the pre-class media and tasks
  • Make sure pre-class tasks are meaningful and hook student interest
  • Ensure there are questions to test understanding of concepts in the pre-class media
  • Use information from students’ completion of pre-class tasks to inform instruction
  • Consider legal aspects in relation to the student's right to privacy and personal data in accordance with the laws of each country
  • Use higher levels of Bloom´s Taxonomy (applying, analyzing, evaluating, creating)
  • Establish clear expectations for student responsibilities during class time 
  • Include practice activities at differing levels to ensure all students have materials to work from that are just above their current ability
  • Use a variety of active learning strategies in the group space such as Project Based Learning, Inquiry, Mastery, Genius Hour, and Peer Instruction
  • Model group space activities for students before starting the activity
  • Never lecture or explain the videos in classroom for those who did not do the pre-class media
  • Set up student-centered activities that encourage students to summarize the content of the pre-class media
  • Include activities that encourage students to create their own content
  • Require reflection at the end of each lesson
  • Be willing to fail at new group space activities and try again
  • Provide differentiation within the group space (tasks, outcomes, support, and resources)
  • Promote collaborative and group work
  • Use both digital and analog tools to foster students’ in-class work
  • Constantly monitor students’ attitudes and achievement and adapt as necessary
  • Plan regular times during a semester/year to get feedback from students
  • Get feedback from your students on pre-class media
  • Get feedback from your students on group-space activities
  • Explain to students how they can become effective Flipped Learners
  • Build positive relationships with students
  • Help students understand why they are learning the concepts
  • Help students to see the big ideas
  • Instruct students on how to operate in a Flipped class
  • Understand each student's cognitive needs
  • Encourage students to see that failure is a learning opportunity
  • Make sure the Flipped Learning vision supports established educational priorities
  • Be aware of current innovations in Flipped Learning
  • Base practice on the most current global research
  • Be active in a local community of Flipped Learning educators
  • Be active in a global community of Flipped Learning educators
  • Continue to develop your Flipped Learning skills and knowledge
  • Collect data on the efficacy of your Flipped class
  • Conduct action research on your class and share with the global community
  • Stay abreast of the latest research on Flipped Learning
  • Build bridges between researchers and practitioners
  • Plan simple workflows for video creation that work within your existing IT infrastructure
  • Choose technology tools which work both in your school and on students’ devices
  • Carefully select tools that protect student privacy and safety
  • Choose tools which have the capability for formative and diagnostic assessment
  • Use a digital portfolio for both teachers and students
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